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2017 Kia Forte LX
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I don't know anything about the 2.4 personally, but if it's the same block as the "world engine" 2.4 shared by several companies, it should be just fine. You PROBABLY should have come here and asked that question BEFORE buying the car, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Funny you mention the 2.4 world engine. My 08 Sebring has the 2.4 world engine with 328000 lol. Those engines are tanks! It’s no sewing machine but it gets the job done. Also it’s not the same 2.4
 

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Well, I wasn't sure about that. I had that 2.4 in my Chrysler 200 and my Dodge Caliber. Caliber got killed in a head on with just 65,000 miles on it. The 200 got traded in on my Forte with just 150,000 miles on it.
 

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2022 Kia Forte LXS Fire Orange
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The 2.4 is made at several locations in the world, and in several variations, so it's hard to generalize about it's durability.

That said, the 2.4 GDI engine in the Hyundai Sonata has been a disaster, as evidenced by the class action lawsuit that forced Hyundai to replace failed engines under a lifetime warranty. Affected engines are from 2011 to 2019.

The main failure is a catastrophic rod bearing breakage between 70,000 - 90,000 miles. My local Hyundai dealership has its lots full of Sonatas waiting for their new engines.

Don't know if there is an equivalent Kia problem, but the word is that failures are due to a design flaw. It is the GDI engine that seems to be so failure prone. Google Sonata engine failures to see the gory facts.

I owned two Sonatas (a 2019 and the failure-ridden 2011) without any problem whatsoever. I have a theory on what is happening.

At around 50,000 miles my 2011 suddenly began burning a lot of oil. I replaced the PCV and the consumption went away. *

I believe the GDI engines are unusually reliant on the PCV system working properly. I surmise that when the PCV fails lubrication is seriously hindered, and the engine begins burning oil that is unnoticed by the owner. The owner drives along while major internal damage accumulates.

Lesson learned, replace the PCV before it fails, say every 50,000 miles. Do it yourself and it costs about $10. YouTube will show you the procedure.

* I also change my oil between 3,000 - 5,000 miles. The oil additives may last longer, but the oil still gets dirty and that's where the wear comes from.
 

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Either it's been luck or my CDO for maintenance. I've never had any major mechanical issues or problems.

Though I really got effing scared when we had extreme & severe freeze (power outtages & deaths freezing temps) in my city that the 1st few times I turned on the car to keep the fluids moving. The loud diesel knocking & sounds coming from the left side (by the oil cap) had me effing scared. Aluminum parts with freezing temps, shrinkage tepms, time to warm, heat to reach all around the engine to expand all moving parts for operations. Damn piston skirt slap ticking grenade syndrome 1st thought.

Aluminum made engines & transmissions despise cold temps. We had 2 days of 40 degree weather it was enough that the diesel knocking wasn't loud. Was there just enough to quell my WTF. Then warmer weather finally showed & the engine was better.

My 2010 Forte Koup SX 2.4L 6MT has been really good to me & my family. Don't know if it's luck or my maintenance CDO Hope the koup lasts me into the hundred thousand miles.

Sorry, didn't mean to jack.
 

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2021 Forte GT w/GT2, Currant Red, Wagner-Tuning Intercooler, Evilla Exhaust, Takeda S2 Intake
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Does anyone know if the 2.4l Kia issue has been seen in the 2020s yet? Thanks
Kias no longer uses the 2.4L engine in the Forte. 2019-and up North American Fortes use either the 2.0L or the 1.6L
 

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My 2013 SX's original engine failed at 68xxx miles. I now have a used engine in the car since Kia discontinued these engines, and all the replacement parts when the lawsuit was going on. This 2nd engine has been knocking for the past year and surprisingly hasn't yet failed, but it gets worse day by day. Kia and Hyundai issued the engine recalls for all the models that had the GDi version of the Theta II, but not the Forte's version. So yes, the 2.4 model does have problems and will likely eventually fail. I've bought replacement parts that I've been able to find, like seals, gaskets, and new bearings. Next month (hopefully) I'll be pulling this engine out and attempting to repair/replace the knocking rod and bearings, as long as my crankshaft hasn't been damaged. I'll also be upping my oil viscosity to try to aide longevity once I get the engine back together.
 

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Be careful adding a thicker viscosity oil. That helps to increase pressure inside the crankcase and might cause a rod bearing or main to fail sooner than if you run the recommended weight. I tried that once with a POS Pontiac I had and it blew the cam seal out the rear of the engine. That's okay though, because I'd sold it two weeks earlier to some guys who were going to replace the engine anyway. They're the ones that told me what happened. For $250, they had a good body with cold a/c and working transmission. I didn't feel the least bit guilty.
 

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Good looking out, but I'm only going up to 5w30 from the recommended 5w20. The engine is shit and has been knocking for way too long, so at this point there's literally nothing to loose.
 
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