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This where i tell the old man he has failed.
1. I posted the video because videos are relevant to todays times and "can" be more educational than reading pages of links putting poeple to sleep like old man stories before we even get to the end.
Since you seem to have ADHD, here are some "relevant to today's times" videos for you since you have trouble focusing long enough to read:


 

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The fact you believe in everything those links talk about is hilarious. In those links: "in most cases" "experts say" (lol)"unlikely " ect.. I can dissect as well. Lol. Some of those links are old as well and ever to be edited, and bias, and written by paid poeple never actually working on engines and ect.. As we seen alot in today world. Gas evolves, and will continue. With gas companies putting new stuff in them (mostly in premium). Again, if you are getting your knowledge from those links that's just sad.
 

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Since you seem to have ADHD, here are some "relevant to today's times" videos for you since you have trouble focusing long enough to read:


1st video saids 89 is Like a lol gas. So if our car calls for 89 you might as well just use premium. LOL

2nd video 1:29. Lol.
Cost less in your pocket but more in the long term. This what I was talking about from the beginning. Lol. This video said exactly what i was talking about with the wellbeing of your vechicle.

So to answer the original post. Skip 89 and just use premium. The end.
 

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The fact you believe in everything those links talk about is hilarious. In those links: "in most cases" "experts say" (lol)"unlikely " ect.. I can dissect as well. Lol. Some of those links are old as well and ever to be edited, and bias, and written by paid poeple never actually working on engines and ect.
Says the guy that posted a video.
 

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2nd video 1:29. Lol
Watch it again. at the 1:29 point in that video they are talking about Top-Tier gas vs non-Top-Tier gas. Not Regular vs Premium. It's very apparent comprehension is your problem.

 

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The video I posted was about gasoline was very informative than your link fest which the video also talked about premium with additives. Which i clearly mentioned many of times. The major point of the post was what to use in this car. Since 89 is LOL you might as well use premium. I clearly answered the question asked before you came in with your nonsense non needed extra crap way off post from the original question. Top tier gas stations provide better premium with lets say "better" additives that benefit than the reg, mid grade they offer and non top tier gas station's premium. Who really goes to non top tier gas stations now? Especially with turbocharged, supercharged, sport/performance vehicles. If they are going to trash gas stations they are not smart about the wellbeing of thier vechicle.
 

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I am still amazed that this comes up. In a nutshell, use the minimum octane required for your engine. That's it.

A longer answer. Engine X has a max potential energy output of Y. That is determined by amount of fuel, amount of air, and the timing of the spark. The 3 things needed for fire are Air/Fuel/Ignition source.

Air and fuel are measured by the computer of the car to be as close to ideal as possible. So the more air you add (Forced induction) the more fuel it will add, which increases the potential energy available. The missing adjustment, is spark. When that spark happens is also determined by the computer as it can change the timing within a certain range.

Here's where octane comes into play. Octane is basically a measurement of how resistant a fuel is to igniting. Lower octane fuels ignite at lower temperatures than higher octane fuels. Forced induction engines produce greater heat during the compression stroke, since there is more air/fuel in the cylinder. A lower octane can ignite from that compression heat earlier than it is supposed to. That is pre-ignition/detonation/knocking, choose your word. A higher octane fuel will not ignite, until the computer wants it to and introduces the spark. Which is why many FI cars REQUIRE a higher octane, to prevent engine damage. Every modern car runs a knock sensor. It it sees pre-ignition it will retard the spark to keep damage from occurring, which also decreases the power output. When there is no detonation it can/will advance timing to take advantage of the maximum amount of power that the engine can make.

So to get the max out of your engine, you need as much spark advance as the engine wants, which often requires a higher octane. You CAN run lower octane (within reason) and still get acceptable performance without knocking as the computer will adjust. You just won't be able to run as hard. I did it often in my twin turbo BMW, because 91/93 is expensive and if I'm just tooling around town I'd like to save a couple bucks. Totally safe unless you run SO low an octane that the computer runs out of adjustment, and then you'll get detonation.

Which brings us to the flip side of the minimum. That minimum number is all that is needed to make 100% of what the engine is capable of making. It won't advance any further, it won't create greater compression than what the engine can already do. Going with a higher octane will do exactly nothing to what the engine can do. All of the actual energy in a fuel is provided by the fuel/air mixture. Octane just keeps it from igniting before it is supposed to. A bajillion octane provides 0 extra power compared to 1 octane.
The minimum on the label, is the octane needed for MAX performance from that engine in stock trim. If you increase air/fuel by tuning or changing the turbo, different story but in stock, 87. And that is measured at sea level. If you're living at 6k feet (I used to) you can run even lower. There's no oxygen in the air, so everything is down on power, less octane is needed. Up there 85 was regular. I'm in florida now and it's 87.

Which brings us to the magic of ADDITIVES! My dad as it happens (retired now) was the head driver for a fuel company. He filled premium stations, he filled mid grade and low grade stations. Every station has big underground storage tanks for fuel, and none have any addition tanks for any magic additives. All additives were added at the refinery. So the truck pulls up, he orders x gallons of high octane, and x gallons of low (there is no mid grade). He then drives to the first station and delivers both, he then drives to the next and delivers both. It doesn't matter if the 1st is a premium station and the 2nd is a low grade or vice-versa. They go the same gas. They got the same additives. There's not 50 different compartments in a trailer. Every station on the route, gets the exact same gas, the exact same additives. And the additives are the bare minimum needed to meet fed guidelines. But they CAN call their premium something entirely different than just premium. They can call it super duper premium fuel with ground up magical fairy's TO KEEP YOUR ENGINE EXTRA CLEAN! But it doesn't matter.

That doesn't mean that there aren't bad stations with crappy gas, but that's usually because that station doesn't maintain its tanks and has nothing to do with what they're being filled with. All gas meets the same standards. There aren't any fly by night refineries out there. They're all tightly regulated.

So again, in a nutshell, run the minimum required and get the max out of your engine. Ignore confirmation bias, I personally have a ford explorer with close to 300k on the odometer and it gets filled up wherever I happen to need gas. So that trumps 100k of 'premium only at top tier stations'. If we use anecdotal evidence and confirmation bias, that means that a beater ford explorer is ultra reliable and a 300k+ engine. But this is my 2nd explorer and I'm borderline amazed everytime it fires up and I drive away. I'm even more amazed when I get home. (Explorers SUCK is what I'm getting at).


It may be 'only a few extra bucks' but if you want to just spend more money than needed I advise you to not spend it on gas and just send the balance to me. You'll spend the same, get the same results, and I'll save it up and put it to something more of use than throwing it away.
 

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I am still amazed that this comes up. In a nutshell, use the minimum octane required for your engine. That's it.

A longer answer. Engine X has a max potential energy output of Y. That is determined by amount of fuel, amount of air, and the timing of the spark. The 3 things needed for fire are Air/Fuel/Ignition source.

Air and fuel are measured by the computer of the car to be as close to ideal as possible. So the more air you add (Forced induction) the more fuel it will add, which increases the potential energy available. The missing adjustment, is spark. When that spark happens is also determined by the computer as it can change the timing within a certain range.

Here's where octane comes into play. Octane is basically a measurement of how resistant a fuel is to igniting. Lower octane fuels ignite at lower temperatures than higher octane fuels. Forced induction engines produce greater heat during the compression stroke, since there is more air/fuel in the cylinder. A lower octane can ignite from that compression heat earlier than it is supposed to. That is pre-ignition/detonation/knocking, choose your word. A higher octane fuel will not ignite, until the computer wants it to and introduces the spark. Which is why many FI cars REQUIRE a higher octane, to prevent engine damage. Every modern car runs a knock sensor. It it sees pre-ignition it will retard the spark to keep damage from occurring, which also decreases the power output. When there is no detonation it can/will advance timing to take advantage of the maximum amount of power that the engine can make.

So to get the max out of your engine, you need as much spark advance as the engine wants, which often requires a higher octane. You CAN run lower octane (within reason) and still get acceptable performance without knocking as the computer will adjust. You just won't be able to run as hard. I did it often in my twin turbo BMW, because 91/93 is expensive and if I'm just tooling around town I'd like to save a couple bucks. Totally safe unless you run SO low an octane that the computer runs out of adjustment, and then you'll get detonation.

Which brings us to the flip side of the minimum. That minimum number is all that is needed to make 100% of what the engine is capable of making. It won't advance any further, it won't create greater compression than what the engine can already do. Going with a higher octane will do exactly nothing to what the engine can do. All of the actual energy in a fuel is provided by the fuel/air mixture. Octane just keeps it from igniting before it is supposed to. A bajillion octane provides 0 extra power compared to 1 octane.
The minimum on the label, is the octane needed for MAX performance from that engine in stock trim. If you increase air/fuel by tuning or changing the turbo, different story but in stock, 87. And that is measured at sea level. If you're living at 6k feet (I used to) you can run even lower. There's no oxygen in the air, so everything is down on power, less octane is needed. Up there 85 was regular. I'm in florida now and it's 87.

Which brings us to the magic of ADDITIVES! My dad as it happens (retired now) was the head driver for a fuel company. He filled premium stations, he filled mid grade and low grade stations. Every station has big underground storage tanks for fuel, and none have any addition tanks for any magic additives. All additives were added at the refinery. So the truck pulls up, he orders x gallons of high octane, and x gallons of low (there is no mid grade). He then drives to the first station and delivers both, he then drives to the next and delivers both. It doesn't matter if the 1st is a premium station and the 2nd is a low grade or vice-versa. They go the same gas. They got the same additives. There's not 50 different compartments in a trailer. Every station on the route, gets the exact same gas, the exact same additives. And the additives are the bare minimum needed to meet fed guidelines. But they CAN call their premium something entirely different than just premium. They can call it super duper premium fuel with ground up magical fairy's TO KEEP YOUR ENGINE EXTRA CLEAN! But it doesn't matter.

That doesn't mean that there aren't bad stations with crappy gas, but that's usually because that station doesn't maintain its tanks and has nothing to do with what they're being filled with. All gas meets the same standards. There aren't any fly by night refineries out there. They're all tightly regulated.

So again, in a nutshell, run the minimum required and get the max out of your engine. Ignore confirmation bias, I personally have a ford explorer with close to 300k on the odometer and it gets filled up wherever I happen to need gas. So that trumps 100k of 'premium only at top tier stations'. If we use anecdotal evidence and confirmation bias, that means that a beater ford explorer is ultra reliable and a 300k+ engine. But this is my 2nd explorer and I'm borderline amazed everytime it fires up and I drive away. I'm even more amazed when I get home. (Explorers SUCK is what I'm getting at).


It may be 'only a few extra bucks' but if you want to just spend more money than needed I advise you to not spend it on gas and just send the balance to me. You'll spend the same, get the same results, and I'll save it up and put it to something more of use than throwing it away.
All respect

The most useful respectful and honest response so far

I believe that this is the end of this discussion

Hopefully every one find the information he needs and do whatever he thinks it's better for their cars

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 

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Guys, Top Tier regular gas gives you the higher detergent levels of some premium fuels. It's what Kia says to use and Consumer Reports confirmed that it is beneficial.
 

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Ok, there's no need to argue this point here any more. If you want to spend the least and buy only regular gas, just do that. If you want to buy the higher grade gas for potential cleaning additives, then do that. Neither of you is going to change the other's mind and you're just wasting time arguing here.
 

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Just picked up the GT M/T a couple weeks ago and I love the car but I haven’t found anywhere that specifically says what octane I should be filling up the 1.6T with, so I’ve been doing premium, but I was wondering whether that’s necessary or even beneficial?
No. Kias do not require premium fuel. It’s pretty much a waste of money.
 
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You're the one that's stubborn and can't accept change. Years ago there was benefit to premium but not today with modern cars and modern fuels.

You're wrong. Accept it and move on.
I agree Nova. 30 years as a Master Mechanic (yes I'm dating myself, lol) and seeing the insides of hundreds of engines gives us the advantage of actually knowing what fuel does for and to an engine. higher-octane fuel has less energy than lower-octane fuel. It’s the fuel’s ability to be compressed more without pre-igniting that results in more power when used in the appropriate engine. Premium gas is not “stronger” gas. And as far as additives that they say are in the fuel is more of a joke than the octane debate. Again it's your belief and right to do what you want to do but know the facts as we do. If you want to maintain your engine health then run what's recommended and use a quality fuel system cleaner, not premium with additives in a low compression engine.
 

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The car is designed to run on 87 octane. As others have probably already said, higher octane will offer you no performance increase. However, if there is increased knock with the lower octane, the computer will retard the timing resulting in reduced performance. Higher octane just reduces the tendency for this to happen. I've run both and noticed no difference, if there is any it's negligible. I imagine that if you are running a performance tune with more aggressive spark curve then you will notice a difference.
 

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Let's please close this useless thread! Buy the gas you want. Don't tell anybody else what you buy. Everyone is happy...
 

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Let's please close this useless thread! Buy the gas you want. Don't tell anybody else what you buy. Everyone is happy...
I didn't start it but I answered the question as did others but it seems as if some of you who have no mechanical knowledge refuse to accept the answer. Modify it, run the wrong fuel, go past oil change intervals and wonder why it's broke. I leave my cars and bikes stock and maintain them correctly and can fix them when they break. Can't say that for 90% of the members in here.
 

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I didn't start it but I answered the question as did others but it seems as if some of you who have no mechanical knowledge refuse to accept the answer. Modify it, run the wrong fuel, go past oil change intervals and wonder why it's broke. I leave my cars and bikes stock and maintain them correctly and can fix them when they break. Can't say that for 90% of the members in here.
Some of us can modify our cars with aftermarket parts MADE FOR THE CAR and still maintain them when they break. If we all just bought and drove our cars there would be no need for car forums since the majority of postings are about what to do for increased performance - be a pretty BORING World if driving our cars was all we did. The octane level of gasoline is NOT DETRIMENTAL to the operation of the engine (obviously not LOWER octane then what is recommended) - YOU DON'T SEE factory warnings NOT using too high of octane...

I respect your idea to not modify your car...I just don't understand why you think you can tell the rest of us not to tinker with our cars.
 

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Some of us can modify our cars with aftermarket parts MADE FOR THE CAR and still maintain them when they break. If we all just bought and drove our cars there would be no need for car forums since the majority of postings are about what to do for increased performance - be a pretty BORING World if driving our cars was all we did. The octane level of gasoline is NOT DETRIMENTAL to the operation of the engine (obviously not LOWER octane then what is recommended) - YOU DON'T SEE factory warnings NOT using too high of octane...

I respect your idea to not modify your car...I just don't understand why you think you can tell the rest of us not to tinker with our cars.
I didn't say that you couldn't. I simply said that if you modify it, expect issues. You're not a skilled mechanic and all the aftermarket parts out there are not as great as you think. It just causes reliability issues and that's up to you to deal with. I'm just telling you from an educated stand point of 30 years as a Master level gas and diesel mechanic that I've seen the issues caused by aftermarket parts and uneducated installation. You can do what you want it's your money. Again the question was asked and several have answered but gotten nothing but guff from the internet technicians in here. I will say that when you do that stuff and it breaks, guess who you are going to visit? Us.
 

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I didn't say that you couldn't. I simply said that if you modify it, expect issues. You're not a skilled mechanic and all the aftermarket parts out there are not as great as you think. It just causes reliability issues and that's up to you to deal with. I'm just telling you from an educated stand point of 30 years as a Master level gas and diesel mechanic that I've seen the issues caused by aftermarket parts and uneducated installation. You can do what you want it's your money. Again the question was asked and several have answered but gotten nothing but guff from the internet technicians in here. I will say that when you do that stuff and it breaks, guess who you are going to visit? Us.
Only 30 years? Sheesh your still a baby. I can assure you the SXTH Element arc welded intercooler is a far better piece of equipment then the cheap crimped factory intercooler - I choose wisely. ...and what reliability issues? I won't be coming to mechanics who think they are legends in their own minds...never had to. I do my own work.

IMG_0366.JPG
 

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:LOL::ROFLMAO::LOL::ROFLMAO:9
Only 30 years? Sheesh your still a baby. I can assure you the SXTH Element arc welded intercooler is a far better piece of equipment then the cheap crimped factory intercooler - I choose wisely. ...and what reliability issues? I won't be coming to mechanics who think they are legends in their own minds...never had to. I do my own work.
Baaaahaaaaa
 
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