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Interesting thing I've noticed on cold starts this winter:

I'll start my car, let it warm for 5 mins, get in, shift into reverse to pull out of my driveway and I'll notice a more-fierce sound/vibration than in Park or in Drive.

This seems to go away ocne the engine is warmer.

Anyone else?

Thanks,

D
 

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Cold transmission fluid can be a wicked thing. Wyoming winters were hard on my cars too and I pretty much learned to ignore strange sounds and behaviors when fluids are cold and thick. My Oldsmobile Calais acted very strangely when temps dropped below zero, but was fine after 10 minutes or so of driving, so I just disregarded it.

Kia likely bought their fluids from the lowest bidder. I can tell the fluid in my manual transmission isn't of very high quality based on how hard it is to shift when cold.

If it continues to bother you, get the transmission fluid changed to a high quality conventional or even a synthetic and see if anything changes. Syn fluids are superior in climates like yours.
 

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Cold transmission fluid can be a wicked thing. Wyoming winters were hard on my cars too and I pretty much learned to ignore strange sounds and behaviors when fluids are cold and thick. My Oldsmobile Calais acted very strangely when temps dropped below zero, but was fine after 10 minutes or so of driving, so I just disregarded it.

Kia likely bought their fluids from the lowest bidder. I can tell the fluid in my manual transmission isn't of very high quality based on how hard it is to shift when cold.

If it continues to bother you, get the transmission fluid changed to a high quality conventional or even a synthetic and see if anything changes. Syn fluids are superior in climates like yours.
Unlike gear oil, which comes in different weights, ATF is pretty much 'one size fits all'. I agree that switching to synthetic may help. But keep in mind, ATF is not thick at low temps like gear oil or motor oil.
 

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Most automatic transmissions have a filter that is located in the transmission pan. Some filters are secured to the transmission with bolts or clips. The transmission filter in this photo is held in by an o-ring seal at the front of the filter. Grasp the transmission filter firmly and twist slightly to remove, fluid will be present in the filter.

that was a better one,LOL!!!
 

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Unlike gear oil, which comes in different weights, ATF is pretty much 'one size fits all'. I agree that switching to synthetic may help. But keep in mind, ATF is not thick at low temps like gear oil or motor oil.
Actually, it's not a "one size fits all" scenario at all. Just for new Ford vehicles alone, there are 4 different types of ATF. And they are anything but interchangeable unless you don't mind paying for a new transmission. And as far as it not thickening when cold, ATF doesn't really even pour in -30 or -40 celcius. It just kinda drops in globs out of the jug.
 

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Actually, it's not a "one size fits all" scenario at all. Just for new Ford vehicles alone, there are 4 different types of ATF. And they are anything but interchangeable unless you don't mind paying for a new transmission. And as far as it not thickening when cold, ATF doesn't really even pour in -30 or -40 celcius. It just kinda drops in globs out of the jug.
Yeh, different mfgrs specify different ATF fluids, but the notion that using Mercon specified ATF in a GM would destroy the transmission is absurd.

You're wrong about ATF being thick when cold. It's much lighter than oil. It's highly detergent. If what you said about ATF not flowing at -30, then every transmission would immediately break down at those temps because unlike the engine, that transmission doesn't heat up quickly.

ATF is basically power steering fluid. So, next time it's -30, remove the cap to your PS resevoir and see if the fluid is globbed up. Ain't gonna happen.
 

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Actually, it's not a "one size fits all" scenario at all. Just for new Ford vehicles alone, there are 4 different types of ATF. And they are anything but interchangeable unless you don't mind paying for a new transmission. And as far as it not thickening when cold, ATF doesn't really even pour in -30 or -40 celcius. It just kinda drops in globs out of the jug.
By the way, do you know that Ford and GM(and others) use the same transmissions in some of their vehicles...made by Borg-warner, Getrag, Aisin, etc? Yet Ford specs Mercon and GM specs Dexron.

And the 4 different Ford spec ATF's are Ford Type F, Mercon, Mercon V, and Mercon SP. Only Mercon SP should not be interchanged because it is a specialty ATF for Ford's 'TorqueShift transmissions.

Hopefully you're not a Ford service technician.;)
 

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And Mercon FNR5 should not be switched with anything else as well as Mercon CVCT. Hell, none of them should be changed with anything really. They don't develop different fluids just to make it more complicated. Although it does seem like that sometimes :p
 

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And Mercon FNR5 should not be switched with anything else as well as Mercon CVCT. Hell, none of them should be changed with anything really. They don't develop different fluids just to make it more complicated. Although it does seem like that sometimes :p
I agree that either something's changing now in the formulation of ATF, or it's like oil, where they keep upgrading the spec and requirements...and supposedly custom taylor it for individual brands and car.

I think the certification number is the most important thing, and what car mfgrs ultimately are showing as a requirement in owners manuals or shop manuals. And that identification/spec crosses over among different makes and models.
 

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All previous DEXRON specifications were replaced once DEXRON-VI was introduced. There are no products approved by GM to carry the DEXRON name unless they have a DEXRON-VI approval and associated license.
[edit] DEXRON-IIE

DEXRON-IIE has been surpassed by DEXRON-III as of January 1, 1994. It is no longer available and its use is no longer recommended. DEXRON-IIE is not compatible in systems requiring DEXRON-III or DEXRON-VI.
[edit] DEXRON-III


  • DEXRON-III is not compatible with the most recently designed transmissions, and the use of these earlier type fluids could result in transmission damage.[1]
  • All DEXRON-III licenses expired at the end of 2006, and will not be renewed. Beyond that date, General Motors will only support the use of DEXRON-VI fluids for use in Hydra-Matic transmissions.[1] Fluids claiming DEXRON-III type performance continue to be sold under abbreviated names such as Dex/Merc and D/M, however, since the DEXRON-III licensing system no longer exists, these fluids are not regulated by GM in any way.
[edit] DEXRON-VI

DEXRON-VI was introduced in 2005. It was designed to replace all prior specifications, and is therefore backward-compatible with applications calling for DEXRON of any type. The specification (GMN 10060) defines both a performance level and specific additives that provide improved shift feel, friction durability and oxidative stability compared to earlier specified fluids.
 
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