Kia Forte Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a very close call this morning, it is freezing cold here in NJ, got into my Koup at 8AM and went to work. Got on the highway driving about 40 MPH and began to brake to slow down for the traffic up ahead..and it would not stop at all..it just kept going [ the road was clear so it was not an ice issue] I then pumped the brakes a few times and I felt the ABS chattering...and still it would not stop. I was not sliding...I just wasn't stopping. My rotors must have had a coat of ice on them. Finally in desperation I swerved into an empty lane and managed to get it to stop. To give a visual, after pumping the brakes I still continued for an additional 20 car lengths. That's a lot. I got off the highway and drove around some local streets to do some slow stop and go driving to let the brakes heat up. Things were fine after that. Warning: do not go to fast on a cold morning unless your brakes have warmed up a bit because you might not have the 'stop on a dime' power like you would expect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Wow, scary I wonder if this has happened to any of our Canadian neighbors of which liver in generally colder areas?
Niet !

And when we say cold... it's cold.

We got a couple of -25 Celcius here (-22 Fahrenheit) and brakes works fine.

Did u washed the car or run in water or snow yesterday ?

Maybe u had condensation and that froze on the rotors... seriously... never happened to me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
Cant say that anything like that has happened to me.

However thankfully you are alright :)

Something to make a note of though....thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,919 Posts
it was 15F last night and went as low as 10 before and never had any problems with the brakes, that being said.


I love our 1000 FT drive way. Great to get a feel for the car before the road, couple of brake tests too (we also have guardrails on the side of it)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
905 Posts
Hmm, not that I don't believe you but how do you get onto a highway from your house without having to stop at at least one sign or light on your way?

What you said makes me wonder if something else isn't wrong. I mean, how did all of your rotors get a layer of ice on them? Doesn't seem possible. Keep an eye on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
I've never had that happen and it was -28 this morning. If the abs was working as you heard the charttering then the road must have been ice covered. The abs detects wheel slippage and reacts accordingly, so that the car does not go into a skid. To some people THAT WOULD APPEAR that the brakes are not working as the tires are not skidding, but in fact they are.

This could be the case but not 100% sure. If it's not I would take it to the dealer and leave it there till they fix whatever is wrong. From the way you describe what happened, if it's not the abs, there must be something wrong with the brake system. A liitle snow or ice would not stop the brakes from engaging after mutiple push's on the pedal.

My money is still on the abs system doing what it's designed to do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
646 Posts
Thanks for the sobering reminder michael.

also in the vein of public service announcements... wear full sleeve gloves when working with Por 15. The MSDS says mild irritation.. the mild irritation resulted in burning through all my skin past the transdermal layer into the muscles of my forearms about 6 years ago. After 3 prescriptions of steroids and creams, I still have some scarring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Rather than ice on the rotors, I would suspect that condensation built up in the slide action of your calipers or in the brake lines themselves preventing them from closing on the rotors. It would give the same kind of feel you are describing but it would also explain the extended time before brake response.
Any ice that was on the rotors themselves would be such a thin layer that the moment your brake pads made contact it would immediately break up the ice and you would only experience a momentary brake failure if any at all. If it's inside the caliper or brake lines then it might take excessive pressure to make it break free.
Either way though, you should definitely have it checked out!
I'm glad that you are alright and were able to avoid an accident and bring the car to a stop!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Possibly, but in order for the abs to activate it must detect wheel slippage at the point of contact, the road. The more I think about this the more it's leaning towards the abs brake system.

Question... was the pavement ice covered or slippery in any way that would cause the tires to skid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Had a very close call this morning, it is freezing cold here in NJ, got into my Koup at 8AM and went to work. Got on the highway driving about 40 MPH and began to brake to slow down for the traffic up ahead..and it would not stop at all..it just kept going [ the road was clear so it was not an ice issue]
I don't think so... but somethimes... we can't see that the road is frozen... Already experienced that earlier this Fall... the way seemed to be on the pavment, but i was driving on a tiny frosted film... that was'nt pleasant !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Well if one of the calipers started to function before the others, especially a rear one, it may have locked up the tire causing the wheel slippage necessary to trigger the abs without affecting the vehicles handling enough to be noticable in a tense situation like this. You could yank the e-brake at 100 Km/h without the vehicle so much as nodding in one direction or the other so other than the slowing of the vehicle you wouldnt know the difference. Now change that to one wheel sliding and maybe a little frost on the road surface, the vehicle will still track straight and the sliding tire won't make much noise at all so when the abs triggers it's reacting to one wheel that you didn't even know was sliding in the first place.
I just find it unlikely that the abs was malfunctioning. An electronic system ought not be affected by temperature, at least not to that extent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Well if one of the calipers started to function before the others, especially a rear one, it may have locked up the tire causing the wheel slippage necessary to trigger the abs without affecting the vehicles handling enough to be noticable in a tense situation like this. ................................
I just find it unlikely that the abs was malfunctioning. An electronic system ought not be affected by temperature, at least not to that extent.
I'm not saying the ABS is defective, it's just doing what it was built for. As far a one wheel locking up and the driver not noticing it.. the road must have be covered with a sheet of ice. Don't think so.

My therory is the roads were slippery and the ABS cut in, (he heard and felt the chattering), and hence it felt like the car would not stop. And it fact that what it was doing nothing out of the ordinary with a ABS system and slippery road surfaces.

If the ABS system fails the brake system still functions as in the older non-equipt abs car would, it going into a skid when you aply the brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
Two days ago I had my brakes fail to apply also. Left a friends place in the morning at -28 C and drove 6 blocks to my underground heated parking. Showered and dressed for work then back in the car and was approaching my garage door to leave the parkade and nothing, the car just kept going towards the closed door. I then jammed on my brakes and they suddenly they caught and stopped the car about an inch from the door. It was quite a surprise. Probably built up a light coat of ice from the condensation and very cold discs in my garage during the 45 minute stopover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,487 Posts
^^^^
hmmm, not the best news I've heard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Everybody's input is excellent and making me re-think what happened. When I leave my house I am immediatly on route 1-9 which is a 40 mph road. I didn't get a chance to hit the brakes at all...I just went to 40mph as usual. My tires were freezing cold and I am using the tires that came with the Koup [crappy all seaonal tires]. I am thinking that maybe with the ice cold tires, an ice cold road...the car did slide [even though I swear I didn't feel it sliding] . When the tires warmed up a bit ...things went back to normal. So in retrospect maybe it was a 50% tires and 50% brakes issue...but I can't confirm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
I'm sorry but if you were using the all seasons that came with the car (crappy) and not using winters there's a HIGH chance your car was just sliding.

Most of the those Hilarious videos of cars just piling up on the highway are of Americans that don't have winters tires and don't drive according to the conditions. You're not supposed to go right to the speed limit if the road is iced over.

I've never had any car's brakes freeze up on me. I always do two things when I drive in the snow.
1. Is to make sure it has snow tires.
2. Is when I leave a lot/work or my house is to do a slight brake check to see what kind of grip I have. When I leave my house or work I'm usually on a fairly empty road or lot. I then give the brakes a bit of pressure to get a feel for the worse case scenario of grip on snow (those small roads and lots aren't plowed). Use common sense here don't jam on your brakes with someone behind you.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top