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'21 Forte FE 6-Speed
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Ok I can’t tell you what to do but... I run my commuters to almost 200k within 5 years and never... NEVER .. do the flushes, brake, injector back flush blah blah blah... if it’s going to break it will break.... flush or not. I have less car problems than anyone I know and I don’t do anything other than general maintenance. I think all the odd additional services is just false sense of security..
Yeah I’ve never run injector cleaner or oil additives through anything I own, both new and old, some with well over 200k on them.
I flush the brake fluid but that’s because I don’t trust old fluid to not boil when I’m driving my stuff hard. It’s cheap insurance and I’d rather not risk failed brakes when ripping it on back roads over saving like $40 every few years
 

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You can't go wrong following the factory service intervals. The engineers have had many years to determine what should and should not be done.

That said, I always follow the Severe Maintenance schedule. It's surprising how much city driving I do, which is hard on a vehicle.

My dealership's fuel injector service consists of adding a bottle of Chevron Techron Complete Fuel System Cleaner, which you can get at WalMart for under $10. It's the black bottle. Works well.

About flushes, my mechanics say to never flush a transmission as the cleaner is a harsh chemical that can damage seals. Follow Kia's recommendation to change, not flush, the transmission fluid.

Some dealerships are more aggressive at upselling than others. If you have the choice, find a more reasonable dealership and spend your money there.
Flushing the transmission is never a good idea if it uses a machine. The only way to flush a transmission properly without causing harm is removing the cooler lines and letting the internal pump pump out the old fluid while sucking in new fluid out of a container
 

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One thing to keep in mind is that with a GDI engine the type of fuel used and/or injector cleaner that you run through the tank will not have the same effect of cleaning the valves as a normal fuel injected engine. When dealerships and shops talk about fuel induction cleaning they are referring to running a cleaner through the throttle body to clean the deposits that build up on the back side of the intake valves. Since the fuel is injected directly into the combustion chamber on a GDI it never passes by the valves. Fuel Induction service is a necessity for GDI engines whether or not you let the dealership do it is your choice.
This is why catch cans are important for GDI engines. Even with them in place, it’s likely still worth it to Seafoam it (or a similar product) through the intake to get the carbon off the valves
 

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All great questions! Firstly, with the fuel system service I wouldn’t recommend. You have Port Injection engine not GDI, so carbon build up on the intake valves shouldn’t be a concern. You can use a bottle of Techron like how someone stated above, I can’t imagine you are hurting anything by using it every so often, maybe once a year? Other than that I wouldn’t worry about your fuel system, put good gas in it, and it should do the rest!

Regarding the transmission flush, I would never recommend it. I would just do fluid and filter changes every 30k-60k miles, but earlier the better. I’m not familiar if you can service the transmission filter in the IVT. Every manufacturer is different so others that have done the fluid change please hop in!

I don’t think it’s necessarily “too early” to do a coolant flush, but if you feel the need it doesn’t hurt anything. There isn’t really a “better” coolant, but there are different types. I wouldn’t get caught up in which brand is better, if you want the “best” or safest I would go with KIA OEM Coolant. The more important part is using the correct coolant Chemical composition. Read your owners manual and make sure they are using the correct type. Color doesn’t necessarily mean the same type either, it is rather confusing lol! What you can do, again read your owners manual to make sure, is you can change the antifreeze to water concentration. Since you live in a hot climate you can do a mix of 60% water to 40% antifreeze, but do not go any lower than 40% of antifreeze. I don’t think you need to do that, but that option is on the table.

Tires are personal preference, read reviews and /or videos and see what others say, as long as they are not the cheapest and a good name brand I don’t think you can go wrong. Hope this helps!
Yep, for the MPI engines, run good gas and run it hard every once in a while to blow out the carbon. Changing the oil regularly and using quality oil is more important than any sort of fuel system cleaner. Also, you can do your own oil changes and save some money and still be within warranty - just keep the receipts, and get the filter from the dealer (it’s like 7 bucks at the parts department).
You don’t need to change the engine air filter every time you do the oil - I drive my car pretty hard, frequently (30k a year) and in occasionally dusty conditions and it was still in ok shape at 30k miles when I changed it the first time. I’d do every 25-30k.
No serviceable transmission filter, if it even has one at all on the IVT. Just change the fluid every 60k like it says and call it good.
I think the manual says the original coolant is good for something like 6 years, then change it every 3 years. You should be good for a while. Use either the genuine Kia stuff or Peak Asian vehicles red stuff.
The tires you linked are apparently pretty good. I run Sumitomo HTR A/S PO3s on mine, and while they do reduce mileage slightly, the grip is great and they seem like they are going to last forever - there’s no noticeable wear in the 15k miles I’ve put on them so far. They are also pretty cheap.
 
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I would recommend both balancing and an alignment when getting new tires. But am thinking you don't need to balance your existing/worn out tires, if you're going to replace them in the near future. That's what I meant originally, sorry for the confusion!
Alignment isn’t totally necessary unless you want to verify alignment “while it’s in there”. Always balance them though
 
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