Kia Forte Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey has anyone looked into swapped a newer sonata head into the 4play??? its a 2.4 wouldnt it bold on? and now having GDI... or maybe even from a 2009 sonata with no gdi?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
I couldn't find a fsm for it but just going by the fact that both are "world engines" and fall under the Theta(II) bracket, I would say, yes, they probably compatible.

Seems interesting, I'm going to have to look into it moar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I couldn't find a fsm for it but just going by the fact that both are "world engines" and fall under the Theta(II) bracket, I would say, yes, they probably compatible.

Seems interesting, I'm going to have to look into it moar.

Yea casue the sonatas get 200hp... that would be a nice bump up for the forte... I just have a feeling that even if it is possible its not going to be worth they money might as well just go turbo... but hey who knows..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
That would be nice because everyone seems to be saying that the forte headers do not need to be replaced because they have been made very well for our car. It would be nice to have another mod that could give us 10-20hp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
if you only want a little bump in power, on demand of course, just go for a zex safe shot kit.... I'm looking into the wet 55hp-75hp shot for next summer since I'm nowhere near the 5000mile break in. the safe shot is lower of course it's 35hp
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,820 Posts
Only issue is that you have to refill all the time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
On the OP. What would be the benefit to replacing the headers in a Forte/Koup with the ones from a Sonata?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
On the OP. What would be the benefit to replacing the headers in a Forte/Koup with the ones from a Sonata?
HEAD, not header.

I see no point in this. Even if it does bolt up, the cost of the parts + the asspain of converting everything over to the GDI engine management would not be worth the 30 HP you think you might get. If you're doing it to be different, that's fine... people also get sex changes to be different... doesn't mean it's a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,487 Posts
^^^
the question on my mind is..
A. how much MpG a tank will you gain from the GDI because maybe in a year that part alone would pay for all the extra work ? I don't know but its a thought
B. Honestly do you think hot rodders back in the day said hey.. that mod is only going to get me a extra 5hp why bother?? NOOO
They said HELL YA Extra 5 hp.. and honestly a extra 30 hp is a nice bump add that with a few other mods and suddenly things are imporving.

Of course I have to say the turbo kit would be better and give you a bigger gain but a person might be able to do this GDI mod alittle cheaper if he / she has the know how to do the work ;)

Just my ten cents :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
unfortunately given the computer aspects this would probably close to impossible .. it would wind up being the price of turboing your car and potentially more..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
^^^
the question on my mind is..
A. how much MpG a tank will you gain from the GDI because maybe in a year that part alone would pay for all the extra work ?
You tell me. You're still going to burn roughly 20 HP worth of gas to move it down the road at legal highway speeds.

B. Honestly do you think hot rodders back in the day said hey.. that mod is only going to get me a extra 5hp why bother?? NOOO
They said HELL YA Extra 5 hp.. and honestly a extra 30 hp is a nice bump add that with a few other mods and suddenly things are imporving.
The hot rodders back in the day were also working with carbs and points on an engine that was incredibly inefficient, so just about anything they did was sure to realize gains. They weren't working on engines with millions of dollars worth of R&D sunk into them run by miles of wires and computers as powerful as any commercially available PC.

No doubt, a bunch of little things add up, but there are far larger gains to be found elsewhere for far less monetary and time investment. Since the donor cars are at most two years old, you're going to be paying a premium for parts; this isn't a $50 head from a '91 Civic we're talking here... expect to pay thousands for the hard parts. Being a high pressure fuel system, you may have to change everything from the tank forward, depending on where Hyundai/ Kia decided to put the high pressure pump. And since you're going to be taking parts from a different car, nothing will line up perfectly in that regard, so you're going to need custom lines made. Then you have the electrical nightmare. Have you ever even looked at a wiring diagram for a modern drive by wire engine management system? Have fun with that mess. So then there's other smaller issues that won't pop up 'till you really get into it. Like cam to deck height... what if the cams on the GDI head are a different height from the deck of the block than the EFI cams? Time for a custom cam chain/ belt to make it work, and adjustable cam gears to make up for any changes in timing the height difference causes. Since the GDI has both a spark plug and injector in the combustion chamber, the valve angles and valve diameters are most likely different than the EFI head, so you're looking at at the very least, cutting the valve reliefs in the top of your existing pistons, and quite possibly, will need entirely new pistons to match the GDI head for this and combustion dynamic reasons (every little bit counts, right? Remember that when you go have custom pistons machined). Other stuff that may pop up is that exhaust and intake ports may be of different sizes and shapes, or that the GDI intake manifold interferes with an accessory or the radiator or hood, or that the GDI throttle body won't line up with your intake...

Kinda get where I'm coming from now? It's not as easy as slapping a head on and going, "OMG, hybrid just like a Honda!"

a person might be able to do this GDI mod alittle cheaper if he / she has the know how to do the work
If the head physically bolts to the block, you're about as close to having the swap done as you are to landing on the moon by jumping on a trampoline. I've been working on and modifying cars for 23 years, and I can tell you from personal experience that there is no practical reason to go through the immense undertaking of swapping over to GDI for a measly 30 HP. Assuming you even get that much out of it. Remember: the engine is a system, so the GDI engine's bottom end most likely has different internals that contribute to the gain in power. Even something as insignificant as a different pressure spring in the oil pump bypass valve will have an effect. Remember: Ever little bit counts. ;)

So let's go back to the whole "mileage increase will pay for the mod" idea you had back there...

A solid estimate for this mod would be in the neighborhood of $4000 at this point in time, assuming you did ALL the work yourself (including various unknown machining/ welding tasks that will pop up). If you think this number is unrealistic, go price everything out and let me know how far off I was. Let's also figure that a realistic mileage increase would be 2 MPG, that you drive 12,000 miles a year and your combined mileage is 32 MPG. You ready for some math? Here we go...

12,000 miles @ 32 MPG= 375 gallons * $3.75/ gallon = $1406.25 (stock engine)

12,000 miles @ 34 MPG= 353 gallons * $3.75/ gallon = $1323.53 (GDI head swap)

That's an awesome savings of $82.72. Or, almost two tanks of gas. Over the course of a year. So how long would that head swap have to be driven to pay for itself?

$4000/ $82.72 = 48.36 years.

So, to reference my previous statement about doing something for the sake of doing something... Have fun with your sex change operation. I'll stick with turbos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,487 Posts
^^^
LOL Ok fair enough

I've built a few cars myself.. one of which was a nissan hardbody I put a 350 chevy motor in it that was a big gain was is worth doing ? yes
did it cost me alot ? no not really.. it was a matter of waiting for the parts to come up.


lets face it just puting the turbo on the koup is costing a large chunk of change.. and even if you keep the car 5 years the turbo most likely is not going to pay itself completly off either.
So its been my plan to work out both down the road.. turbo and GDI I honestly plan to keep this car intell I'm dead or its dead or both lol :) So whatever I spend on it wont really matter anyway lol

please dont take my post as a HAHA or A eff you or as some kind of I know better then you or as a I'm mad and I'm going to argue tell I'm blue in the face ;)

But I have a plan to just by a GDI motor and computer for my koup down the road.. seeing the guys thread I was doubting it would be as easy as just putting the GDI head on the stock motor But I've not done any homework on that yet ;)

But I get what your saying its not a real pratical way to find H/P gains

not too be a jerk but in most peoples eyes even bothering to buy a compact car for 20,000 dollars and then spending another 4 to 5 just for a turbo kit is not real pratical either lol,
But I agree the turbo is closer to pratical yet still
to me building cars is about a dream, you dream a dream and then you turn that into something real.. and people can go wow that guys Effing nuts why did he even bother? but then they see it run and go OOh Thats why
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Just a thought I think I would approach this similarly as if it were a JDM swap and swap in a complete engine wiring harness and computer .

Would be neat to see.

I don't think I would take on this project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
FORTE/FORTE KOUP(TD) >2011 > G 2.4 DOHC > Engine Mechanical System
Removal
Engine removal is not required for this procedure.


Use fender covers to avoid damaging painted surfaces.

To avoid damaging the cylinder head, wait until the engine coolant temperature drops below normal temperature before removing it.

When handling a metal gasket, take care not to fold the gasket or damage the contact surface of the gasket.

To avoid damage, unplug the wiring connectors carefully while holding the connector portion.

Mark all wiring and hoses to avoid misconnection.
1.
Disconnect the battery terminals (A).
2.
Remove the engine cover (B).
3.
Disconnect the ECM connector (C).
4.
Disconnect the breather hose and then, remove the air duct (D) and air cleaner assembly (E).
Tightening torque :
7.8 ~ 9.8N.m (0.8 ~ 1.0kgf.m, 5.8 ~ 7.2lb-ft)

5.
Remove the under covers (A).
Tightening torque :
9.8 ~ 11.8N.m (1.0 ~ 1.2kgf.m, 7.2 ~ 8.7lb-ft)

6.
Loosen the drain plug (A), and then drain the engine coolant.

7.
Remove the radiator upper hose (A) and lower hose (B).
8.
Remove the heater hoses (C).
9.
Disconnect the brake booster vacuum hose (D).

10.
Disconnect the wiring connectors and harness clamps from the engine.
(1)
Disconnect the ETC connector (A) and knock sensor connector (B).
(2)
Disconnect the PCSV connector (C).
(3)
Disconnect the ECT connector (D).
(4)
Disconnect the condenser connector (E).
(5)
Disconnect the CKP sensor connector (F).
(6)
Disconnect the oxygen sensor connector (G).

(7)
Disconnect the VCM connector (A) and MAP sensor connector (B). (SULEV type only)

(8)
Disconnect the power steering fluid pressure switch connector (A).
(9)
Disconnect the MAP sensor connector (B).
(10)
Disconnect the OPS connector (C).
(11)
Disconnect the alternator connector (D) and ‘B’ terminal cable from the alternator.
(12)
Disconnect the A/C switch connector from the compressor.
(13)
Disconnect the VIS connector.

(14)
Disconnect the intake OCV connector (A).

(15)
Disconnect the CMP sensor connector (A) and fuel hose (B).

(16)
Disconnect the injector connectors (A) and ignition coil connectors (B).

11.
Remove timing chain. (Refer to Timing system in this group)
12.
Remove the intake and exhaust manifold. (Refer to Intake and exhaust system in this group)
13.
Remove the water temperature control assembly (A).

14.
Remove the intake CVVT assembly (A) and exhaust CVVT sprocket or camshaft sprocket (B).
[Single CVVT]

[Dual CVVT]


When removing the sprocket bolt or CVVT assembly bolt, fix the camshaft by wrench at position A.

15.
Remove the camshaft.
(1)
Remove the front camshaft bearing cap (A).

(2)
Remove the exhaust camshaft upper bearing (A). (Dual CVVT only)

(3)
Remove the camshaft bearing cap (A), in the sequence shown.

(4)
Remove the camshafts (A).

(5)
Remove the exhaust lower bearing (A). (Dual CVVT only)

16.
Use a torx wrench, remove the intake OCV (A).

17.
Remove the exhaust OCV (A). (Dual CVVT only)
18.
Remove the cylinder head bolts, then remove the cylinder head.
(1)
Using triple square wrench, uniformly loosen and remove the 10 cylinder head bolts, in several passes, in the sequence shown. Remove the 10 cylinder head bolts and plate washers.


Head warpage or cracking could result from removing bolts in an incorrect order.
(2)
Lift the cylinder head from the dowels on the cylinder block and place the cylinder head on wooden blocks on a bench.

Be careful not to damage the contact surfaces of the cylinder head and cylinder block.
19.
Remove the cylinder head gasket.
Disassembly

Identify MLA(Mechanical Lash Adjuster), valves, valve springs as they are removed so that each item can be reinstalled in its original position.
1.
Remove the MLAs (A).

2.
Remove the valves.
(1)
Using SST(09222-3K000, 09222-3K100), compress the valve spring and remove retainer lock.

(2)
Remove the spring retainer.
(3)
Remove the valve spring.
(4)
Remove the valve.
(5)
Using needle-nose pliers, remove the valve stem seal.
Inspection
Cylinder Head
1.
Inspect for flatness.
Using a precision straight edge and feeler gauge, measure the surface the contacting the cylinder block and the manifolds for warpage.
Flatness of cylinder head gasket surface
Standard : Less than 0.05mm(0.002in.) (0.02mm(0.0008in.)/100x100)
Flatness of manifold mounting surface
Standard : Less than 0.1mm(0.0039in.)

2.
Inspect for cracks.
Check the combustion chamber, intake ports, exhaust ports and cylinder block surface for cracks. If cracked, replace the cylinder head.
Valve And Valve Spring
1.
Inspect valve stems and valve guides.
(1)
Using a caliper gauge, measure the inside diameter of the valve guide.
Valve guid I.D.
Intake / Exhaust : 5.500 ~ 5.512mm (0.216 ~ 0.217in.)

(2)
Using a micrometer, measure the diameter of the valve stem.
Valve stem O.D.
Intake : 5.465 ~ 5.480mm (0.2151 ~ 0.2157in.)
Exhaust : 5.458 ~ 5.470mm (0.2149 ~ 0.2153in.)

(3)
Subtract the valve stem diameter measurement from the valve guide inside diameter measurement.
Valve stem-to-guide clearance
[Standard]
Intake : 0.020 ~ 0.047mm (0.0008 ~ 0.0018in.)
Exhaust : 0.030 ~ 0.054mm (0.0012 ~ 0.0021in.)
[Limit]
Intake : 0.07mm (0.0027in.)
Exhaust : 0.09mm (0.0035in.)
If the clearance is greater than maximum, replace the valve and valve guide.
2.
Inspect the valves.
(1)
Check the valve is ground to the correct valve face angle.
(2)
Check that the surface of the valve for wear.
If the valve face is worn, replace the valve.
(3)
Check the valve head margin thickness.
If the margin thickness is less than minimum, replace the valve.
Margin
[Standard]
Intake : 1.02mm(0.0401in.)
Exhaust : 1.09mm(0.0429in.)

(4)
Check the valve length.
Valve length
[Standard]
Intake : 113.18mm(4.4559in.)
Exhaust : 105.84mm(4.1669in.)
[Limit]
Intake : 112.93mm(4.4461in.)
Exhaust : 105.74mm(4.1630in.)
(5)
Check the surface of the valve stem tip for wear.
If the valve stem tip is worn, replace the valve.
3.
Inspect the valve seats
Check the valve seat for evidence of overheating and improper contact with the valve face.
Replace the seat if necessary.
Before reconditioning the seat, check the valve guide for wear. If the valve guide is worn, replace it, then recondition the seat. Recondition the valve seat with a valve seat grinder or cutter. The valve seat contact width should be within specifications and centered on the valve face.
4.
Inspect the valve springs.
(1)
Using a steel square, measure the out-of-square of the valve spring.
(2)
Using a vernier calipers, measure the free length of the valve spring.
Valve spring
[Standard]
Free height : 47.44mm (1.8677in.)
Out-of-square : 1.5°

If the free length is not as specified, replace the valve spring.
MLA
1.
Inspect the MLA.
Using a micrometer, measure the MLA outside diameter.
MLA O.D.
Intake/Exhaust :
31.964 ~ 31.980mm(1.2584 ~ 1.2590in.)
2.
Using a caliper gauge, measure MLA tappet bore inner diameter of cylinder head.
Tappet bore I.D.
Intake/Exhaust :
32.000 ~ 32.025mm(1.2598 ~ 1.2608in.)
3.
Subtract MLA outside diameter measurement from tappet bore inside diameter measurement.
MLA to tappet bore clearance
[Standard]
Intake/Exhaust : 0.020 ~ 0.061mm(0.0008 ~ 0.0024in.)
[Limit]
Intake/Exhaust : 0.07mm(0.0027in.)
Camshaft
1.
Inspect the cam lobes.
Using a micrometer, measure the cam lobe height.
Cam height
[Standard value]
Intake :
Single CVVT : 43.70 ~ 43.90mm (1.7204 ~ 1.7283in.)
Dual CVVT : 44.10 ~ 44.30mm (1.7362 ~ 1.7440in.)
Exhaust : 44.90 ~ 45.10mm (1.7677 ~ 1.7756in.)

If the cam lobe height is less than standard, replace the camshaft.
2.
Inspect the camshaft journal clearance.
(1)
Clean the bearing caps and camshaft journals.
(2)
Place the camshafts on the cylinder head.
(3)
Lay a strip of plastigage across each of the camshaft journal.

(4)
Install the bearing caps.

Do not turn the camshaft.
(5)
Remove the bearing caps.
(6)
Measure the plastigage at its widest point.
Bearing oil clearance
[Standard value]
Intake :
No.1 journal : 0.022 ~ 0.057mm (0.00087 ~ 0.00224in)
No.2,3,4,5 : 0.045 ~ 0.082mm (0.00177 ~ 0.00323in)
Exhaust:
Single CVVT
No.1,2,3,4,5 : 0.045 ~ 0.082mm (0.00177 ~ 0.00323in)
Dual CVVT
No.1 : 0 ~ 0.032mm (0 ~ 0.0012)
No.2,3,4,5 : 0.045 ~ 0.082mm (0.00177 ~ 0.00323in)
[Limit]
Intake:
No.1 journal : 0.09mm (0.0035in)
No.2,3,4,5 : 0.12mm (0.0047in)
Exhaust :
No.1,2,3,4,5 : 0.12mm (0.0047in)

If the oil clearance is greater than maximum, replace the camshaft. If necessary, replace cylinder head.
(7)
Completely remove the plastigage.
(8)
Remove the camshafts.
3.
Inspect the camshaft end play.
(1)
Install the camshafts.
(2)
Using a dial indicator, measure the end play while moving the camshaft back and forth.
Camshaft end play
[Standard value] : 0.04 ~ 0.16mm (0.0016 ~ 0.0062in.)
[Limit] : 0.18mm (0.0071in.)

If the end play is greater than maximum, replace the camshaft. If necessary, replace cylinder head.
(3)
Remove the camshafts.
Exhaust Cam Shaft Bearing
1.
Check the cylinder head bore mark.
Location Of Cylinder Head Bore Mark

Discrimination Of Cylinder Head
Class
Mark
Exhaust No.1 Inside Diameter Of Cylinder Head Bore
a
A
40.000 ~ 40.008 mm
(1.5748 ~ 1.5751 in.)
b
B
40.008 ~ 4.016 mm
(1.5751 ~ 1.5754 in.)
c
C
40.016 ~ 40.024 mm
(1.5754 ~ 1.5757 in.)

2.
Select class of camshaft bearing same as class of cylinder head as shown on the table below.
Place Of Exhaust Cam Shaft Bearing Identification Mark

Discrimination Of Exhaust Camshaft Bearing
Cylinder
Head Bore
Class
Bearing Class For Installing (Color)
Thickness Of Bearing
a (A)
C (Green)
1.996~2.000mm
(0.0785~0.0787in.)
b (B)
B (None color)
2.000~2.004mm
(0.0787~0.0788in.)
c (C)
A (Black)
2.004~2.008mm
(0.0788~0.0790in.)

Oil clearance : 0 ~ 0.032mm (0 ~ 0.0012in.)
CVVT Assembly
1.
Inspect CVVT assembly.
(1)
Check that the CVVT assembly will not turn.
(2)
Apply vinyl tape to the retard hole except the one indicated by the arrow in the illustration.
Verify the hold to tape and the hole to put air in.

(3)
Wind tape around the tip of the air gun and apply air of approx. 150kpa(1.5kgf/cm², 21psi) to the port of the camshaft.
(Perform this in order to release the lock pin.)

When the oil splashes, wipe it off with a shop rag and the likes.
(4)
With air applied, as in step(3), turn the CVVT assembly to the advance angle side (the arrow marked direction in the illustration) with your hand.
Depending on the air pressure, the CVVT assembly will turn to the advance side without applying force by hand. Also, under the condition that the pressure can be hardly applied because of the air leakage from the port, there may be the case that the lock pin could be hardly released.

(5)
Turn the CVVT assembly back and forth and check the movable range and that there is no disturbance.
Standard:
Should move smoothly in a range from about
22.5° (Intake) / 20.0° (Exhaust)
(6)
Turn the CVVT assembly with your hand and lock it at the maximum delay angle position (counter clockwise).
Reassembly

Thoroughly clean all parts to be assembled.
Before installing the parts, apply fresh engine oil to all sliding and rotating surfaces.
Replace oil seals with new ones.
1.
Install valves.
(1)
Using SST(09222-4A000), push in a new oil seal.

Do not reuse old valve stem seals.
Incorrect installation of the seal could result in oil leakage past the valve guides.

(2)
Install the valve, valve spring and spring retainer.

Place valve springs so that the side coated with enamel faces toward the valve spring retainer and then installs the retainer.
(3)
Using the SST(09222-3K000, 09222-3K100), compress the spring and install the retainer locks. After installing the valves, ensure that the retainer locks are correctly in place before releasing the valve spring compressor.

(4)
Lightly tap the end of each valve stem two or three times with the wooden handle of a hammer to ensure proper seating of the valve and retainer lock.
2.
Install the MLAs.
Check that the MLA rotates smoothly by hand.


MLA can be reinstalled in its original position.
Installation


Thoroughly clean all parts to be assembled.

Always use a new head and manifold gasket.

The cylinder head gasket is a metal gasket. Take care not to bend it.

Rotate the crankshaft, set the No.1 piston at TDC.
1.
Install the OCV filter.


Keep the OCV filter clean.
2.
Install the cylinder head gasket (A) on the cylinder block.


Be careful of the installation direction.

Apply liquid gasket (Loctite 5900H) on the edge of cylinder head gasket upside and downside. (At the position 'B')

After applying sealant, assemble the cylinder head in five minutes.

3.
Place the cylinder head carefully in order not to damage the gasket with the bottom part of the end.
4.
Install cylinder head bolts.
A.
Apply a light coat if engine oil on the threads and under the heads of the cylinder head bolts.
B.
Using the SST(09221-4A000), tighten the cylinder head bolts and plate washers, in several passes, in the sequence shown.
Tightening torque :
32.4~36.3Nm (3.3~3.7kgf.m, 23.9~26.8lb-ft) + (90~95°) + (90~95°)

Always use new cylinder head bolt.

5.
Install the intake OCV (A).
Tightening torque :
9.8 ~ 11.8N.m (1.0 ~ 1.2kgf.m, 7.2 ~ 8.7lb-ft)

6.
Install the exhaust OCV (A). (Dual CVVT only)
Tightening torque :
9.8 ~ 11.8N.m (1.0 ~ 1.2kgf.m, 7.2 ~ 8.7lb-ft)



Do not reuse the OCV when dropped.

Keep the OCV filter clean.

Do not hold the OCV sleeve (A) during servicing.

When the OCV is installed on the engine, do not move the engine with holding the OCV yoke.

7.
Install the camshafts.

Apply a light coat of engine oil on camshaft journals.
(1)
Install the exhaust camshaft lower bearing (A). (Dual CVVT only)

(2)
Install the camshafts (A).

(3)
Install the exhaust camshaft upper bearing (A) to the front bearing cap (A). (Dual CVVT only)

8.
Install camshaft bearing caps in their proper locations.
Tightening order.
Group A → Group B → Group C.
Tightening torque :
M6 : 10.8 ~ 12.7N.m(1.1 ~ 1.3kgf.m, 7.9 ~ 9.3lb-ft)
M8 : 27.4 ~ 31.4N.m(2.8 ~ 3.2kgf.m, 20.2 ~ 23.1lb-ft)

9.
Install the intake CVVT assembly (A) and exhaust CVVT sprocket or camshaft sprocket (B).
[Single CVVT]

[Dual CVVT]


When installing the sprocket bolt or CVVT assembly bolt, fix the camshaft by wrench at position A.

10.
Install the water temperature control assembly (A).
Tightening torque :
Bolt : 14.7 ~ 19.6N.m(1.5 ~ 2.0kgf.m, 10.8 ~ 14.5lb-ft)
Nut : 18.6 ~ 23.5N.m(1.9 ~ 2.4kgf.m, 13.7 ~ 17.4lb-ft)



Assemble water temp control assembly and water inlet pipe to water pump assembly before nuts for assembling of water inlet pipe to be tightened.

Insert after wetting O-ring or inner surface of thermostat housing.

Always use a new O-ring.
11.
Install the timing chain. (Refer to Timing system in this group)
12.
Install the intake and exhaust manifold. (Refer to Intake and exhaust system in this group)
13.
Check and adjust the valve clearance. (Refer to General information in this group)
14.
Install cylinder head cover.
(1)
The hardening sealant located on the upper area between timing chain cover and cylinder head should be removed before assembling cylinder head cover.
(2)
After applying sealant, it should be assembled within 5 minutes.
Bead width : 2.5mm (0.1in.)

(3)
Install the cylinder head cover bolts as following method.
Tightening torque :
1st step : 3.9 ~ 5.9N.m(0.4 ~ 0.6kgf.m, 2.9 ~ 4.3lb-ft)
2nd step : 7.8 ~ 9.8N.m(0.8 ~ 1.0kgf.m, 5.8 ~ 7.2lb-ft)



Do not reuse cylinder head cover gasket.

The firing and/or blow out test should not be performed within 30 minutes after the cylinder head cover was assembled.
15.
Install the other parts in the reverse order of removal.


Refill engine oil.

Clean the battery posts and cable terminals with sandpaper assemble them, and then apply grease to prevent corrosion.

Inspect for fuel leakage.
-
After assembling the fuel line, turn on the ignition switch (do not operate the starter) so that the fuel pump runs for approximately two seconds and fuel line pressurizes.
-
Repeat this operation two or three times, and then check for fuel leakage at any point in the fuel lines.

Refill radiator and reservoir tank with engine coolant.

Bleed air from the cooling system.
-
Start engine and let it run until it warms up. (Until the radiator fan operates 3 or 4 times.)
-
Turn off the engine. Check the level in the radiator, add coolant if needed. This will allow trapped air to be removed from the cooling system.
-
Put radiator cap on tightly, then run the engine again and check for leaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
be sure to port and polish before install.....hahahah:D:D ill wait to do this till after the turbo and need an extra 50hp(ported/polish,and bigger valves)

but good find im sure this is gonna help someone soon. whoever dose it needs to take pics of all the steps:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
its off kiatechinfo.net but yeah im anxious for some performance based things like cams, cranks, new pistons, stiffer springs, and better valves. oh well the race team did minor things and they get 240 bhp so i am very impressed with all of this i want a 2.0 fly wheel and a better shift cable but all in due time im more focused on the go fast!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
this is a guide on how to remove the heads in our car i cant find the sonata head diagram but hell it a lot of work for this 30 hp!
The physical act of removing a head from one of these engines shouldn't take more than an hour. But as I went over previously, there are much more serious issues to deal with.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top