Kia Forte Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought my Forte as a CPO in June with just under 16k miles on it. Starting last week with around 17.5k, the Check engine light came on showing P0302, cylinder 2 misfire. I'd heard about the coil issues that these have, and went to my dealership a few days later, and they replaced the coil #2 under warranty (but none of the others). But later that day, on the way home from work, I noticed that the car seemed to be stuttering when accelerating. When I checked with my OBDII scanner, I saw that P0302 was still there, as a pending code this time. The next day the light came back on and I made arrangements to bring my car back to the dealer the day after that. So after bringing my car back to the dealer, they told me that there had been a misfire on Cylinder #3 (not 2) from a bad fuel injector which they replaced. On the drive home, it seemed ok, but when I tried accelerating very slowly when I got close to home, I thought I could feel the stuttering again.

By now, the car has really annoying shakes and shudders that you can randomly feel, especially around 25-35 MPH, but the check engine light is not coming back on. That being said, I can see on the mode 6 data that the misfire count on cylinder #2 increases while I drive, though apparently not enough to trip a code yet. So at this point I'm not sure what I should do. I could take it back again, but I feel like they won't do anything if there is no code for them to clear. Does anyone here have suggestions? Is there anyone here that works for Kia that can give advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
This shop sounds like a collection of part hangers, which isn't so unusual these days. They typically rely on their GDS diagnostic tool to give them the answer and, if it doesn't, they just scratch their head, take a guess, and hang on a part. But in this case there is some diagnostic testing you can do on your own, without affecting the warranty (because they won't even know you did it). Naturally you do this stuff only if the performance problems are present.

The first is to remove the spark plugs and check their condition. Although the mileage on your vehicle is not anywhere close to needing the plugs changed, there's always a possibility of one having been damaged.

And while the plugs are out you can also check the spark. If you don't have a spark tester, there's the ******* test of grounding the plugs on the block, and watching the spark while a helper cranks. Better is an inline spark tester, or an HEI tester, and checking with both tools is even better if you have them. Pull the fuel pump relay and run the engine out of fuel before doing the crank testing.

And the final thing you can test is that the injectors are firing, specifically that #2 is functioning like the other 3. Some folks use noid lights, but I prefer to use the tried-and-true method of touching a long screwdriver blade to the injectors, and putting your ear to the butt end to hear the clicking pattern of the injector, while the engine is idling. All 4 of them should have the same clicking pattern at constant RPM.

However, if you don't want to DIY, then try to find a shop that knows what they're doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I bought my Forte as a CPO in June with just under 16k miles on it. Starting last week with around 17.5k, the Check engine light came on showing P0302, cylinder 2 misfire. I'd heard about the coil issues that these have, and went to my dealership a few days later, and they replaced the coil #2 under warranty (but none of the others). But later that day, on the way home from work, I noticed that the car seemed to be stuttering when accelerating. When I checked with my OBDII scanner, I saw that P0302 was still there, as a pending code this time. The next day the light came back on and I made arrangements to bring my car back to the dealer the day after that. So after bringing my car back to the dealer, they told me that there had been a misfire on Cylinder #3 (not 2) from a bad fuel injector which they replaced. On the drive home, it seemed ok, but when I tried accelerating very slowly when I got close to home, I thought I could feel the stuttering again.

By now, the car has really annoying shakes and shudders that you can randomly feel, especially around 25-35 MPH, but the check engine light is not coming back on. That being said, I can see on the mode 6 data that the misfire count on cylinder #2 increases while I drive, though apparently not enough to trip a code yet. So at this point I'm not sure what I should do. I could take it back again, but I feel like they won't do anything if there is no code for them to clear. Does anyone here have suggestions? Is there anyone here that works for Kia that can give advice?
My 05 Grand Cherokee did the same thing. I finally got word it was a blown head gasket. Yep. The mechanic asked me if I overheated it. I said no, He then said it probably had a bad gasket installed at the factory!
I hope this helps you . BTW I do own a 2018 Forte lx with S style....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I don't know if you all get alerts when I post, but I just wanted to update this whole thing here. I had been getting emails from the dealer asking me to answer a survey for my experience, and I decided to write out basically everything here.

A couple days later I got a call from the dealer following up and asking if I'd like to bring the car back so they can look at it again. I brought it back, and showed them what it was doing, and showed them the data from my OBDII scanner that showed cylinder #2 was misfiring. They took it in and asked me to give them some time to look at everything.

At the end of that day, I got a call from the dealer saying that the problem was indeed on #2, and that they'd found a fouled spark plug, and low compression on that cylinder. At that point, I know where it was going, but they told me they'd need a few days while they go back and forth with Kia headquarters on the next steps for diagnosis and whatnot. They called a few days after that to let me know that after taking the head of the engine, they found some scoring on the cylinder walls, and that Kia approved replacement of, as he called it, "the long block engine assembly" all under warranty.

Since then, I've just been waiting for them to get the new engine in and install it. They set me up with a rental Soul while I wait for all of that. Totally sucks that a year-old car with 17,600 miles needs a new engine, but at least it's covered under warranty. Hopefully I won't feel or hear any weird things after the engine replacement.

Also, fun fact: the Soul I'm driving seems to have the GDI variant of the same 2.0 Nu engine in my Forte. Has 32,000 miles so my car experience was obviously a fluke, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
.... Has 32,000 miles so my car experience was obviously a fluke, right?
Good to read they finally got it figured out, and took care of this under warranty without first going into a dealer dance.

AFA your problem being a fluke, for certain the Nu engines have nowhere near the reported problems that the Thetas do. However, there have been a few threads on the Hyundai forums, which tend to indicate that the Nu is not at all problem-free. I have no idea what the extent of those issues are, only that some have been reported. No recalls or other notifications as of this date, but stay tuned because one can never be sure of anything when it comes to Kia/Hyundai engines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
I don't know if you all get alerts when I post, but I just wanted to update this whole thing here. I had been getting emails from the dealer asking me to answer a survey for my experience, and I decided to write out basically everything here.

A couple days later I got a call from the dealer following up and asking if I'd like to bring the car back so they can look at it again. I brought it back, and showed them what it was doing, and showed them the data from my OBDII scanner that showed cylinder #2 was misfiring. They took it in and asked me to give them some time to look at everything.

At the end of that day, I got a call from the dealer saying that the problem was indeed on #2, and that they'd found a fouled spark plug, and low compression on that cylinder. At that point, I know where it was going, but they told me they'd need a few days while they go back and forth with Kia headquarters on the next steps for diagnosis and whatnot. They called a few days after that to let me know that after taking the head of the engine, they found some scoring on the cylinder walls, and that Kia approved replacement of, as he called it, "the long block engine assembly" all under warranty.

Since then, I've just been waiting for them to get the new engine in and install it. They set me up with a rental Soul while I wait for all of that. Totally sucks that a year-old car with 17,600 miles needs a new engine, but at least it's covered under warranty. Hopefully I won't feel or hear any weird things after the engine replacement.

Also, fun fact: the Soul I'm driving seems to have the GDI variant of the same 2.0 Nu engine in my Forte. Has 32,000 miles so my car experience was obviously a fluke, right?
That really may have just been a dud. I only recall one Atkinson 2.0 Nu failing and that's because the owner was clueless. 26K on the original oil. Perhaps the previous owner beat the living hell out of it. Perhaps it was a manufacturing error.

In my opinion, I partially believe they went non GDI after 2016 because of all the failed Nu motors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Perhaps the previous owner beat the living hell out of it. Perhaps it was a manufacturing error.
Mine was a former rental car (lesson learned on that front) and the dealer got it around 15k miles, then sold it as a certified preowned. I don't suppose that long without an oil change could do it? My first oil change was due at around 19k according to the dealer that sold it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
CPO is just another marketing term. To me it just means yes, the car was in fact certified to be previously owned by someone else :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I finally got the car back with the new engine i it. Surprisingly, it doesn't change gears as hard as it did sometimes before, which I never thought could be a symptom of a bad engine before. It also doesn't have nearly as much vibration when idling now (it used to do this kind of pulsing vibration). Oddly, though, the first time I tried to start the car after I got it home, it would only click. I got it to start after just turning the key repeatedly for a minute, so I think there's a loose starter connection. Regardless, I'm going to be super paranoid about every noise my car makes for several months now.

I'm just glad that the major problem should be solved now. And I'm thankful for my warranty; my service adviser showed me the invoice, I saved over $8,000! Let's hope this all ends here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I finally got the car back with the new engine i it. Surprisingly, it doesn't change gears as hard as it did sometimes before, which I never thought could be a symptom of a bad engine before. It also doesn't have nearly as much vibration when idling now (it used to do this kind of pulsing vibration). Oddly, though, the first time I tried to start the car after I got it home, it would only click. I got it to start after just turning the key repeatedly for a minute, so I think there's a loose starter connection. Regardless, I'm going to be super paranoid about every noise my car makes for several months now.

I'm just glad that the major problem should be solved now. And I'm thankful for my warranty; my service adviser showed me the invoice, I saved over $8,000! Let's hope this all ends here.
Glad to hear you got it back Crazzy. They probably put the old starter on the new (rebuilt) engine. Hopefully this engine will break-in ok & you'll basically be starting out now with a brand new car, with many years of trouble free driving :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Glad to hear you got it back Crazzy. They probably put the old starter on the new (rebuilt) engine. Hopefully this engine will break-in ok & you'll basically be starting out now with a brand new car, with many years of trouble free driving :)
Thank you! Do you think it would be a rebuilt and not new engine? They're still producing it, so I assumed it would be brand new. And I know they didn't replace the starter, just the block and probably head. As far as breaking in, I'm following Engineering Explained's advice as closely as I can because I want to be SURE that everything is done right from day 1.

The dealer told me that they took care of break-in and that I didn't have to do anything (my dashcam shows that they drove it mostly on the freeway for about 30 minutes), but I'm still going to do it my way.

Anyway now all I have to do besides that is re-learn everything about how it drives. I really don't know what's supposed to be normal and what's abnormal. I'm afraid that every small bump is a misfire. But no worries, I'll get used to it and calm down soon enough.

Also, just for fun, here's the video of me starting my car at the dealer for the first time when I picked it up.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I'm with you Crazzy, follow your own break in (I like Engineering Explained too). 30 min freeway drive doesn't cut it.

I can't say for sure, but I would guess it was a rebuilt they used. It's rare they would ever put a new one in. Not that big a deal as it would have new pistons & rings & gaskets either way.

Just keep up with oil changes & never let it get low, plus other regular maintenence & it should be pretty trouble free for years to come.

PS: I liked your start-up video. That feeling of "this could go one of two ways" was in the pit of my stomach :)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top