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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just received my Roadruns front grill unpainted because I want to paint it flat black to match the EX models front black pieces. What is the best paint to use for this?
Does it need a cover paint to protect it from rock chips or will that add a glossy look which I don't want?
 

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You are exactly right as far as any kind of top coat, it will end up shiny. Is it made from Urethane or fiberglas? If urethane, you'll want to find something with a flex agent so that it will move with the grille and absorb all kinds of impacts and chips. If fiberglas, you can just get a can of Tremclad for $4 and go nuts. As many light coats as you want, allow plenty of time between them all for drying.

No matter the material, you'll want to clean that primer coating, and possibly even give it a 1000 grit scuffing, prior to any paint. Starting off with the best prep will ensure the best results and no matter what kind of paint you use, laying it over fingerprint grease and shop dust will only cause problems later.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info KiaTech.

It's made of fiberglass and the grill is metal. Grey primer is coated on all of it.

How well will Tremclad take a rock hit?

A M P Body Panels on North Edmonton said they can mix up a flat black paint and put it in a can it so I can paint it for 33 dollars. Not sure what they are using.

Should I try and run the 1000 grit paper over the metal grill or should that part be good enough as is?
 

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If it's 100% primer, then just wipe it down with a pre-painting prep cleaner (ask at Napa or maybe a PartSource will have it) it's like TSP for your house walls, but it just removes any residue, fingerprints, dust, etc. prior to spray. Then hang it in your garage, and hit it with your paint.

Tremclad is tough stuff... and cheap, too... so it's usually my choice when 'not shiny' is needed. Thin, light coats is the secret to durability. The sanding would only be required if the primer has runs, or if there was no primer at all, and you were shooting on bare material.

Oh, and the best part of flat finishes is that rock chips are ridiculously easy to fix, later... you can spray paint onto a bit of cardboard, and use a small brush to dab it into the chip, like a paint pen. Repeated applications and you can fill in the chip entirely, and it disappears... not so easy on gloss.
 
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