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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,


I want to start by saying I have a 2011 2.0 Koup with 110500. This code came up in January to which I've replaced the fuel pump/filter, done intake manifold gaskets, and paid a shop to test for vacuum, and exhaust leaks; to which they found nothing. So I did a carbon clean out on their advice and the code came back after 120miles. I just dont know what to do at this point when a shop even says nothing is visible wrong.
Has anyone had this code? And can you help?



Fuel trim was 25% in Feb right at the limit.
Yesterday it was up to 37% when code returned.
 

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You didn't say anything about checking the upstream O2 sensor and the injectors, which are the 2 most common causes for that code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Upstream is slow in responding but not a cause for concern downstream is perfect. And the injectors were tested as well to which they are completely fine in working order. The code is sent by upstream sensor so they are telling me to replace that sensor. Which is fine I just dont see the issue especially when they also tell me that the O2 is fine just a tad slower than the downstream when responding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No idea who 'they' is, or why they said to replace it if it's 'fine'.
As mentioned in the original post, I have taken it to a shop to get everything with this code properly inspected... "they" or the shop to be more clear is advising to just replace the O2 because they found no vacuum leaks, no exhaust leaks, and no issues with fuel injection which are all the main causes for this code. And its all because the upstream is marginally slower than the downstream sensor. So thats the point of this post to see if changing it is even advisable or if anyone has seen this code with similar experience?
 

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Did this shop try to test the O2 sensor by adding external fuel (starter fluid, carb cleaner, propane, …), in order to see if the sensor was immediately reading richer as more was added? If not, IMO the sensor shouldn't be evaluated as fine.

But in any case, the answer to your question is sure, why not hang on a new O2 sensor, particularly the upstream which is a very easy and not overly expensive DIY. I'd run the above testing first, but also wouldn't take issue with someone just replacing one or both of them. They do sometimes wear out over time, and the sensor makers typically recommend replacing them around 100K miles or so as routine maintenance (although I don't follow that recommendation myself).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Got the sensor changed out. The shop did test the sensor via adding an outside fuel additive like propane. To which this is how they confirmed it was changing, just slower or more lazy than they downstream. Only drove about 80miles but so far no light. But I'll keep this discussion up to date with changes once they happen.
 
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