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2022 Kia Forte LXS Fire Orange
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I used to be involved in general aviation. Many aircraft owners take a sample of the oil before an oil change and send that sample to an oil analysis company to determine the type of wear, i.e., how many aluminum, iron, steel, or brass particles were in the oil.

There are oil analysis companies for autos, too, and you can split open the oil filter if you want to see if any particulates have been left behind.

In my 50+ years of driving I've taken a more proactive approach. I change my oil on Kia's severe service schedule (in fact, all my service). Oil additives break down over time and use and I want the oil out before that happens. Also, oil gets dirty and those remnants of combustion contribute to wear.

Yep, I spend more money this way, but my cars go 100,000+ with no oil burning or loss of performance.
Addressing your question directly, the main type of contaminants after engine assembly are silica (a fine sand, left over from the casting process, and all the initial engine wear items -- steel, brass, aluminum, etc.). (If the lost foam casting process is used, then a different type of material is left behind.)

Solution: With a new engine I change the oil initially at 1,000 miles. This gives the engine enough initial wear to begin the break-in process, and doesn't leave all of the initial contamination for a long period of time. To my knowledge, no manufacturer uses break-in oil anymore. Instead, they run the engine at the factory for the initial wear-in.

I'm sure many will say I am throwing away money, but I've never had an powertrain related breakdown or had an engine that burned oil. Since I always get a premium for my well-running trade-in, I think I'm getting some of that money back.

Motor flushes are unnecessary when the oil is clean. I've always been wary of the effect on seals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I used to be involved in general aviation. Many aircraft owners take a sample of the oil before an oil change and send that sample to an oil analysis company to determine the type of wear, i.e., how many aluminum, iron, steel, or brass particles were in the oil.

There are oil analysis companies for autos, too, and you can split open the oil filter if you want to see if any particulates have been left behind.

In my 50+ years of driving I've taken a more proactive approach. I change my oil on Kia's severe service schedule (in fact, all my service). Oil additives break down over time and use and I want the oil out before that happens. Also, oil gets dirty and those remnants of combustion contribute to wear.

Yep, I spend more money this way, but my cars go 100,000+ with no oil burning or loss of performance.
Addressing your question directly, the main type of contaminants after engine assembly are silica (a fine sand, left over from the casting process, and all the initial engine wear items -- steel, brass, aluminum, etc.). (If the lost foam casting process is used, then a different type of material is left behind.)

Solution: With a new engine I change the oil initially at 1,000 miles. This gives the engine enough initial wear to begin the break-in process, and doesn't leave all of the initial contamination for a long period of time. To my knowledge, no manufacturer uses break-in oil anymore. Instead, they run the engine at the factory for the initial wear-in.

I'm sure many will say I am throwing away money, but I've never had an powertrain related breakdown or had an engine that burned oil. Since I always get a premium for my well-running trade-in, I think I'm getting some of that money back.

Motor flushes are unnecessary when the oil is clean. I've always been wary of the effect on seals.
I’m talking with the engines that had leftovers from the engine plant that caused rod bearing falure
 

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2017 Kia Forte LX
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773 Posts
I don't even know if they sell it anymore, but have you ever heard of GUNK Engine Flush? We used to use that on old cars we'd buy and not have any service history on. It came in a 1 quart can. We'd drain a quart of oil out of the crankcase after warming the engine up and then put in a can of Gunk and run the car for a while and then do a complete oil change. It worked pretty well. There's a company called Blackstone that I know a lot of people use to get their oil analyzed. You can pull them up online and request a test kit and they'll mail you one free of charge. Put a sample in and send it back and for a fee, they'll tell you what they find. I don't know how much the fee is.
 

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2021 Forte GT w/GT2, Currant Red, SXTH Element Intercooler Kit, Evilla Exhaust, Takeda S2 Intake
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2010-2013 Fortes are essentially 9 to 13-year-old cars...if you're worried about an assembly problem now I don't really think you have that much to worry about! I get a kick out of people thinking cars are supposed to last forever...
 
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